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Stop At One: Make your first break your last

The 2012 Stop At One campaign was closely tied with the launch of Capture the Fracture, a programme that maps Fracture Liaison Services worldwide and promotes best practice. The campaign helped make the importance of secondary fracture prevention a reality at a global, regional and local level.

The ‘capture the fracture’ theme highlighted the importance of preventing second and third fractures.

Three Key Messages

  1. Fragility fractures are no accident
    Each year millions of mostly older adults will suffer a devastating hip fracture caused by a simple fall from standing height. Millions more will suffer fractures of the spine, wrist, shoulder and pelvis. These fractures are no accident! It is likely that the underlying cause is osteoporosis.
  2. Fractures are warning signs: One fracture leads to another
    • A person who has suffered an osteoporotic fracture is twice as likely to suffer a fracture in the future if no diagnosis and treatment for osteoporosis has been provided.
    • Approximately half of all people who have had one osteoporotic fracture will have another, with the risk of new fractures increasing exponentially after each fracture.
    • One in four women who have a new vertebral fracture will fracture again within one year.
  3. Over 50 and had a fracture? Get tested - get treated
    If you are 50 years of age or older and have had a fracture you should ask your doctor for a clinical assessment that will include a bone mineral density test and, if available for your country, a FRAX® online fracture risk assessment. Based on the results, your doctor will be able to make recommendations about what you can do to reduce your likelihood of having future fractures. 

Facts About Secondary Fracture Prevention

Approximately half of all people who have had one osteoporotic fracture will have another.

One in four women who have a new vertebral fracture will fracture again within one year.

Eighty per cent of fragility fracture patients are neither assessed nor treated for osteoporosis or falls risk to reduce future fracture incidence.

Treating fracture patients for osteoporosis can reduce the overall incidence of hip fracture by 20-25%.

 

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